Compression – Paul Kneale

May 3rd, 2018 - May 31st, 2018

Brussels

Curated by artuner

Paul Kneale is a Canadian new media artist, interested in exposing the often overlooked facets of our daily encounters with the digital. In this exhibition, he presents new works from two of his best-known bodies of work: Scanner Paintings and the Event Horizon series.

Artworks
in this exhibition

ARTUNER is pleased to present Compression, the first solo exhibition of works by Paul Kneale in Belgium.

Open Thursday to Saturday, 10 am – 6 pm
Until: 5th May 2018
Independent Régence, Rue de la Régence, 67 1000 Brussels

Paul Kneale is a Canadian new media artist, interested in exposing the often overlooked facets of our daily encounters with the digital. In this exhibition, he presents new works from two of his best-known bodies of work: Scanner Paintings and the Event Horizon series.

Kneale’s Scanner Paintings series inhabits the liminal space between the digital and the physical: these non-figurative compositions are created through the use of multiple consumer-grade scanners, employed en lieu of a set of paintbrushes. Although their means of creation is pioneering, these artworks are in fact concerned with two themes that traditionally pertain to painting: the exploration of light and the passage of time.

Through his creative process that consists in layering slow high resolution scans with low resolution ones, Kneale captures what he describes as ‘time sandwiches’: as the LED strip moves across the scanner bed at different speeds, it captures subtle fluctuations of light and the flowing of time in ever different and unique ways. Although they look abstract, these paintings are, on the contrary, very literal records of natural phenomena that elude human perception.

Paul Kneale’s ‘Event Horizon’ sculptural series investigates the contemporary urban landscape, probing the boundaries between what we experience as the ‘everyday’ and what can be described as the ‘new abject’.

Also for this series the artist works with a range of mundane, daily objects, repurposed and altered so that they simultaneously evoke a sense of alienation and familiarity in the viewer. The selected objets trouvés are finally crowned with a hovering neon halo: the tempered glass tubes are filled with free-flowing noble gases whose random interactions with each other and an electric current produce a blazing glow.

The title ‘Event Horizon’ references the edge of a black hole, the place from which no light escapes and also time stops. The metallic mobiles created for this exhibition float in the gallery space like discarded satellite or rocket parts: space junk - material aimlessly wandering our solar system, an immense space that we are not even inhabiting yet, but that we have, nonetheless, already littered with both physical debris and the sheer clutter of our digital data.

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