Rowena Harris

Accreted Part 2, 2013

Uncategorized

Dimensions Variable


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Artwork
Description

Paper, Photocopy, Enamel Coated Steel, Nylon, 70 x 45 x 35cm (Approx. dimensions) Photographer credit © Original&theCopy

Accreted Part 2 is a mobile consisting of three parts (circle, square and triangle) using the same faded colours as Accreted Part 1, pale green, yellow and white. The skeletal steel, which forms the structure used to display the sheets of paper becomes an integral part of the sculpture itself, supporting the photocopied paper components. There is a pronounced reference to Alexander Calder and minimalism while the strongly geometric components show a Constructivist influence.

The way in which the paper hangs also evokes a sense of abandon; the idea of ink drying on paper. The sheets themselves show impressions of the t-shirts found in Accreted Part 1. In a more general sense it could be said that Accreted Part 2 acts as a physical manifestation of the artist’s video practice. We are presented with a different form of moving image. Harris toys with our perception of the object’s value while the mobile configuration is nostalgic, pointing to a childhood naiveté thanks to minimal and pure forms.

About
the artist

Rowena Harris (b. 1985, Norfolk, UK) lives and works in London. She received a BA in Fine Art at University College Falmouth, UK and an MFA in Art Practice at Goldsmiths College, London. In 2014 she won the Sainsbury’s Scholarship for The British School in Rome where she is currently working.

Rowena Harris is a multi-disciplinary artist. She uses materiality to instigate an exploration of the relationship between individuals and concrete artefacts, in an increasingly digitised environment. There is a heavy importance placed upon communication with the viewer, using objects to create a utilitarian discourse, pertaining to everyday entities and their aesthetic value.

In constructing this aesthetic, Harris uses materials such as concrete, Perspex and resin, which are implacably utilitarian; synthetic symbols of the individual's ability to create, but also contain a perceived soullessness, devoid of natural meaning. However, Harris ensures the human is present in all her works; particularly through the representation of hands, symbolising man's innate propensity for creation and suggesting his synthetic creations are ultimately an extension of humanity, a projection of its social consciousness.

Harris’ practice centres upon human perception and furthermore encompasses the phenomenological self into her work. As a result the body becomes part of the composition and comments upon the fact that humanity is defined by its potential to create. As a result, the technological and the synthetic become an extension of the organic. This is enhanced by a sense of individuation, whereby there are several disparate elements connected together, thematically or physically. Digital elements often provide an accompaniment to this, exemplifying the way objects are appreciated, dependent upon the way in which they are encountered. It also suggests the increasing unification of the human in a technologically advancing world.

Harris’ work constitutes an exploration of a shared experience between humankind and its creations, but also highlights the nature of discrete external objects and their unification, facilitated by human perception. The artist's oeuvre exemplifies the way in which humanity is simultaneously unified by a utilitarian desire for progress and individuated by phenomenological experience.


Rowena Harris is a multi-disciplinary artist. She uses materiality to instigate an exploration of the relationship between individuals and concrete artefacts, in an increasingly digitised environment. There is a heavy importance placed upon communication with the viewer, using objects to create a utilitarian discourse, pertaining to everyday entities and their aesthetic value. Harris’ work constitutes an exploration of a shared experience between humankind and its creations, but also highlights the nature of discrete external objects and their unification, facilitated by human perception. The artist’s oeuvre exemplifies the way in which humanity is simultaneously unified by a utilitarian desire for progress and individuated by phenomenological experience.


Rowena Harris
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

December 8th, 2014 until
February 25th, 2015
Curated by Kirsty Ogg