David Czupryn

Bodycult, 2017

Oil on Canvas

180 x 130 cm


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Artwork
Description

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Czupryn’s works constitute surreal trompe l’oeil: details attract the eye like magnets and amalgamateto freakish effect. Each painting is like a visual riddlea jigsaw for us to reconstruct, piece by piece.In Bodycult, for example, we may recognise Lichtenstein’s Landscape with Grass and Richard Artschwagger’s Table with pink tablecloth, alongside works by Hans Bellmer and Keith Haring. These multiple references call for close inspection and add multiple layers of allusive (and elusive) meaning.One of these layers of meaning is, undoubtedly, the story of the artist’s reverence towards his art historical ancestors. Perhaps another layer witnesses Czyuprn’s struggle to overcome, match, or outdo his particularly successful predecessors by means of appropriation and parody. Then, of course, there are the layers of meaning which can be gleaned even without knowledge of the painting’s many canonical references. It is perfectly possible to encounter Bodycult as a standalone piece: a surreal still-life perhaps, or a window onto a fantasy world in which inanimate objectslike the small anthropomorphic puppet with an orange triangular headcan leap through space.

About
the artist

David Czupryn (b. 1983) is a German artist who recently graduated from the Düsseldorf Kunstakademie (2007 – 2015). He studied sculpture with Prof Georg Herold, and then painting in the classes of Lucy McKenzie and Tomma Abts. In 2016, he was the recipient of the 70th International Bergische Art Prize. He now lives and works in Düsseldorf.

Czupryn started his artistic career as a sculptor, with Herold and later decided to focus solely on painting: he stopped sculpting altogether and put all his artworks in a storage. For months, all day long, he would practice on painting techniques, trompe l’oeil in particular, as taught by McKenzie. There has been a turning point in his subject matter in 2012, when he saw a late Gothic grisaille painting of a sculpture. Then, he took his earlier sculptures out of storage and started portraying them in painting.

His technique is seamless: the ‘layer method’ employed by Czupryn is very meticulous and the brushstrokes result invisible. Indeed, the surface of the painting is very flat, while also conveying a sense of deepness and richness of the materials depicted. The synthesis of nature and industrially engineered materials is a very important aspect of the artist’s work.

In his surrealist paintings David Czupryn creates fantastic worlds, inhabited by humanoid hybrids and built with materials found at the intersection between nature, man-made polymers and imagination. His practice is mostly informed by a research of the uncanny, conducted from a mostly ‘visceral’ perspective. Indeed, although interested in psychoanalytical theories, Czupryn does not explore them in his works.

Surrealism and Metaphysical art (Salvador Dalì and Giorgio de Chirico in particular) are undoubtedly the first points of reference that come to mind when looking at Czupryn’s paintings. However, the artist’s most important sources of inspiration are the works of the photographer Diane Arbus and American artist Matthew Barney.


In his surrealist paintings David Czupryn creates fantastic worlds, inhabited by humanoid hybrids and built with materials found at the intersection between nature, man-made polymers and imagination. His practice is mostly informed by a research of the uncanny, conducted from a mostly ‘visceral’ perspective. Indeed, although interested in psychoanalytical theories, Czupryn does not explore them in his works.

Surrealism and Metaphysical art (Salvador Dalì and Giorgio de Chirico in particular) are undoubtedly the first points of reference that come to mind when looking at Czupryn’s paintings. However, the artist’s most important sources of inspiration are the works of the photographer Diane Arbus and American artist Matthew Barney.


David Czupryn
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

October 1st, 2017 until
December 16th, 2017
Curated by ARTUNER