Paul Kneale

Dogwhistle Minimalism, 2018

Inkjet on Canvas

210.8 x 147.3 cm


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Artwork
Description

When speaking on the implications of the digital age, artist Paul Kneale finds that  “After this passing historical period ‘Art’, you have this new period ‘Internet'”. For Kneale, the reconstitution of art into digital replicas, and the expansive influence of new media upon perception and collective consciousness, constitutes an new era of art-making entirely.

The selected painting exemplifies Kneale’s interest in using digital technologies to confound the boundaries between mediums. Using image scanners, he generates effects reminiscent of traditionally applied media. Intangible expressions of light and physical impressions of RGB ink confluge in a composition derived from hybrid production methods. In Dogwhistle Minimalism, the artist brings together techniques used to create his scan transfers as well as his scanner paintings: indeed, the ‘ink blots’ that so prominently characterise this work are the by-product of the ink-and-acetone drippings occurring while creating his scan transfers.

In Dogwhistle Minimalism, pulsating, fluid forms of purple and pink float across a field of radiating horizontal lines. By integrating physical pigments into his process, Kneale distorts the distinctions between painting and photography.

About
the artist

Born in 1986 in Canada, Paul Kneale received his MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art (London) in 2011 and has been working closely with ARTUNER since early 2015.

His latest works are currently on show in the Contemporary Photography Forum exhibition of the Boca Raton Museum. In the past year, his works have been featured in the Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, the Rubell Family Collection and at the prestigious Thetis Gardens in the Arsenale Novissimo (Venice), in a group exhibition on view during La Biennale di Venezia 57°. He lives and works in Toronto.

Paul Kneale is interested in how the world is constantly translated into a digital language which simplifies, trivialises and depersonalises content and the people it addresses. The artist explores the way in which digital facets of our existence can be manifested and reimagined in the flesh of the physical object.

The artist has been manipulating cheap scanners to generate a unique way of painting. Rather than capturing an image, the scanner creates an impression of the ambient light within the artist’s studio, bearing the abstract visual trace of the atmosphere surrounding the machine. The process is integral to his new works: the scanner paintings are built up from unique impressions and display multiple layers and striations often between transparent sheets and the colours resulting from varying light conditions in the artist’s studio.

The contrast between machines and their serial products results in what Paul Kneale defines as the “new abject”. In response to Julia Kristeva’s 1980 text ‘Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection’, the artist identifies a “new abject” for the information technology.

Describing today’s inherent revulsion for brand new materials, he pinpoints a disorientation in the consciousness of time and location, caused by our immaterial inhabitation of new technologies. This sentiment is embodied in works which often address, in original and innovative ways and media, the simultaneity and layering occurring in our ever-linked virtual existences.

Kneale, in an interview with i-D, defines the Internet as ‘a whole way of being in the world’. His practice aims at investigating the role of art in this new enigmatic dimension. Paul Kneale is an artist that explores the possible physical manifestations of the digital. His oeuvre reflects on the implications of algorithms and information flux. While these may seem very abstract entities, they constitute and shape our domestic daily environment.

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Kneale is interested in how the world is constantly translated into a digital language which simplifies, trivialises and depersonalises content and the people it addresses. The artist explores the way in which digital facets of our existence can be manifested and reimagined in the flesh of the physical object.

 


Paul Kneale
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

May 3rd, 2018 until
May 31st, 2018
Curated by ARTUNER