Toby Ziegler

Double meander, 2017

Oil Paint on Aluminium

155 x 230 cm


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Artwork
Description

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Toby Ziegler’s work responds to twenty-first century visual culture: how images exist in the world and how they are consumed. The digital proliferation of images has altered the ways in which the human subject both receives and relates to them. Ziegler reissues found digital pictures with a palpable sense of materiality. Images, as viewed on a screen, are imprinted onto a surface; recast in material form as to induce an interaction between digital and physical pictorial realms.

Ziegler’s ‘Double meander’ is an aluminium panel, which reveals the processes by which it was made. The first process: the selection and reproduction of canonical source material, second: the disruptive application of a viscus layer of yellow paint and lastly: erasure and abstraction of the original image through the use of a rotary sander. To look at ‘Double meander’ is to look at Henri Matisse’s ‘Large Reclining Nude’, digitised, reimagined and reconfigured. It is to witness a physical response to this digitalisation; it is to observe the effects of materiality on a Google image page – damage, wear, and dilapidation. Yet, the artist’s hand remains present. The yellow paint is a bold overlay of colour that resembles a spiritual symbol while emphasising the act of painting itself.

About
the artist

Toby Ziegler (b. 1972) is a British artist who lives and works in London. He graduated from Central St. Martins School of Art and Design in 1994.

Ziegler’s practice encompasses both painting and sculpture. His work involves the manipulation of perception: abstraction and figuration fraternise, classical compositions surrender to digital reworking. Ziegler begins with mined Internet images and coerces them into material form, fashioning an exchange between the virtual and the actual. The starting point may vary: Matisse, Constable or Dutch still-life. Once selected, however, the image is inscribed onto either canvas or aluminium panels by Ziegler’s own hand, an intricate and meticulous process that allows for the appearance of the artist’s own idiosyncrasies. Following the application of paint, the image is subject to a period of erasure, which Ziegler refers to as: evacuation. Evacuation involves the use of correction fluid or a metal grinder in order to distort and degrade; reducing the image down until Ziegler deems that what is left is, necessary.

Ziegler’s works are terrains both familiar and strange: the transformative process designed to test the limits of imitation against a Neo-Platonic system of ideals. This is what underpins the sequence of images, which loop on LED screens in many of his exhibitions. The screens recite the conversion of the originally selected source material into Ziegler’s own works, and then the permeation of that work into popular culture. The suggestion being that contemporary art and pop culture are the by-products of the same – imperfect – process of imitation.  For Ziegler, it is the duty of the artist to interpret the mechanisms behind this process, to reveal all its mimetic and degraded nuances.


Ziegler’s works are terrains both familiar and strange: the transformative process designed to test the limits of imitation against a Neo-Platonic system of ideals. This is what underpins the sequence of images, which loop on LED screens in many of his exhibitions. The screens recite the conversion of the originally selected source material into Ziegler’s own works, and then the permeation of that work into popular culture. The suggestion being that contemporary art and pop culture are the by-products of the same – imperfect – process of imitation.  For Ziegler, it is the duty of the artist to interpret the mechanisms behind this process, to reveal all its mimetic and degraded nuances.


Toby Ziegler
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

February 28th, 2017 until
April 15th, 2017
Curated by ARTUNER