Paul Kneale

Downtown Meeting, 2015

Digital Print on Linen

198.1 × 139.7 cm


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Additional Information

Comes in a USB presentation box and certificate issued by the artist.

Purchasers of the work will receive the file on a usb key in a presentation box. The buyer has the right to print and possess one copy of the work at a time. If so desired, the artist will produce the work for the buyer.

Artwork
Description

The work of Paul Kneale concerns the advent of the digital era, but his artistic explorations are of loftier, more cerebral concepts than representing the mere foibles of 21st Century technology. The landscape of the digital is a key facet of his practice, as he explores the way in which it can be manifested and reimagined in the flesh of the physical object.

Boldly distancing himself from the boundaries of traditional representation the series featured in Studioscape is entitled Post-post-post production. The five works featured are made with cheap, consumer grade scanner-printers; the scan function is used with the lid open and nothing on the bed. What results is a capture of multiple elements of the surrounding environment; the glass, the space above, and the light conditions in Kneale’s studio at the time; daylight, darkness, strip lighting. The image is also affected by the different resolutions of the scan, and their respective exposures times; from a few seconds to maybe half an hour or more. The layering which can be seen in some of the images is a result of this, and also achieved through feeding low grade office supply materials, like printable transparencies, through the print function while the scan is being made. This creates an opaque print from the commercial RGB inks, which can be then fed back through with another scan on top, or they themselves can be scanned. Kneale describes this layering as a ‘time sandwich’. A fast, low resolution scan over a slow high resolution. The image of time which is represented becomes complicated and multiplied. Being cheap scanners, their capacity to deal with such labours is short-lived. Some will wrongly interpret the colours they have just printed, producing wild acid tones and neons. Or the machine will jam while threading the plastic sheet back through again, ripping or even melting it. The actual marks of the physical body of the machine can become visible, in addition to its image-producing disposition. In the final element of production, the computer files are used to print the image into the surface of an archival canvas at a large scale. This material, which is traditionally used for painting, permits and intense depth of colour and detail from the inks used.

Kneale concedes that while the images are records of the environment, there is something more complex in their significance. In the scanner paintings, translations of matter and form are occurring; there is a new hybridity that a language is being developed for. Yet to define the pieces as ‘abstract’ is not wholly accurate in the context of art movements. Kneale describes abstraction as something which has a foundation in the ‘definable’, and then moving away from it into gesture and symbol. Yet in the Post-post-post production series, there is no genesis in the formally representable. The products and parts of technology can be depicted, but the digital has always been an abstract idea; Kneale has succeeded in transforming it into a tangible realm.

About
the artist

Born in 1986 in Canada, Paul Kneale received his MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art (London) in 2011 and has been working closely with ARTUNER since early 2015. Work by Kneale have been included in the exhibition Peindre la Nuit at Centre Pompidou Metz (October 2018), Contemporary Photography Forum exhibition of the Boca Raton Museum (Florida, USA), the Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, the Rubell Family Collection and at the prestigious Thetis Gardens in the Arsenale Novissimo (Venice), in a group exhibition on view during La Biennale di Venezia 57°. He lives and works in Toronto.

Paul Kneale is interested in how the world is constantly translated into a digital language which simplifies, trivialises and depersonalises content and the people it addresses. The artist explores the way in which digital facets of our existence can be manifested and reimagined in the flesh of the physical object. The artist has been manipulating cheap scanners to generate a unique way of painting. Rather than capturing an image, the scanner creates an impression of the ambient light within the artist’s studio, bearing the abstract visual trace of the atmosphere surrounding the machine. The process is integral to his new works: the scanner paintings are built up from unique impressions and display multiple layers and striations often between transparent sheets and the colours resulting from varying light conditions in the artist’s studio.

The contrast between machines and their serial products results in what Paul Kneale defines as the “new abject”. In response to Julia Kristeva’s 1980 text ‘Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection’, the artist identifies a “new abject” for the information technology. Describing today’s inherent revulsion for brand new materials, he pinpoints a disorientation in the consciousness of time and location, caused by our immaterial inhabitation of new technologies. This sentiment is embodied in works which often address, in original and innovative ways and media, the simultaneity and layering occurring in our ever-linked virtual existences. Kneale, in an interview with i-D, defines the Internet as ‘a whole way of being in the world’. His practice aims at investigating the role of art in this new enigmatic dimension. Paul Kneale is an artist that explores the possible physical manifestations of the digital. His oeuvre reflects on the implications of algorithms and information flux. While these may seem very abstract entities, they constitute and shape our domestic daily environment. To follow Paul Kneale and receive exclusive updates, click here.


Kneale is interested in how the world is constantly translated into a digital language which simplifies, trivialises and depersonalises content and the people it addresses. The artist explores the way in which digital facets of our existence can be manifested and reimagined in the flesh of the physical object.


Paul Kneale
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

May 13th, 2015 until
July 21st, 2015
Curated by Eugenio Re Rebaudengo