David Czupryn

Each One Teach One, 2017

Oil on Canvas

180 x 130 cm

Private collection


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Artwork
Description

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As the title suggests, Each One Teach One harbours particularly personal resonances for the artist.While David Czupryn’s paintings frequently depict works by the artists who have inspired him, the allusions here follow a very direct line of influence: Sigmar Polke (whose Raster Drawing forms the top right corner of Czupryn’s canvas) was the professor of Georg Herold; and Georg Herold (whose wooden sculptures inspire the large abstract shapes here) was the professor of Czupryn himself. As a result, Each One Teach One seems far less equivocal about that which the artist usually leaves veiled; namely, the fact that Czupryn’s artistic echo chambers work to honour and emulate his art historical idols. This aside, Each One Teach One is emblematic of Czupryn’s oeuvre, particularly in its joyous reverie in various materials and textured surfaces. The pebble-dashed wall in the background, for instance, is rendered convincingly tactile through the artist’s characteristic trompe l’oeil technique, which allows him to convey even the most minute variations of recession and protrusion.

About
the artist

David Czupryn (b. 1983) is a German artist who recently graduated from the Düsseldorf Kunstakademie (2007 – 2015). He studied sculpture with Prof Georg Herold, and then painting in the classes of Lucy McKenzie and Tomma Abts. In 2016, he was the recipient of the 70th International Bergische Art Prize. He now lives and works in Düsseldorf.

Czupryn started his artistic career as a sculptor, with Herold and later decided to focus solely on painting: he stopped sculpting altogether and put all his artworks in a storage. For months, all day long, he would practice on painting techniques, trompe l’oeil in particular, as taught by McKenzie. There has been a turning point in his subject matter in 2012, when he saw a late Gothic grisaille painting of a sculpture. Then, he took his earlier sculptures out of storage and started portraying them in painting.

His technique is seamless: the ‘layer method’ employed by Czupryn is very meticulous and the brushstrokes result invisible. Indeed, the surface of the painting is very flat, while also conveying a sense of deepness and richness of the materials depicted. The synthesis of nature and industrially engineered materials is a very important aspect of the artist’s work.

In his surrealist paintings David Czupryn creates fantastic worlds, inhabited by humanoid hybrids and built with materials found at the intersection between nature, man-made polymers and imagination. His practice is mostly informed by a research of the uncanny, conducted from a mostly ‘visceral’ perspective. Indeed, although interested in psychoanalytical theories, Czupryn does not explore them in his works.

Surrealism and Metaphysical art (Salvador Dalì and Giorgio de Chirico in particular) are undoubtedly the first points of reference that come to mind when looking at Czupryn’s paintings. However, the artist’s most important sources of inspiration are the works of the photographer Diane Arbus and American artist Matthew Barney.


In his surrealist paintings David Czupryn creates fantastic worlds, inhabited by humanoid hybrids and built with materials found at the intersection between nature, man-made polymers and imagination. His practice is mostly informed by a research of the uncanny, conducted from a mostly ‘visceral’ perspective. Indeed, although interested in psychoanalytical theories, Czupryn does not explore them in his works.

Surrealism and Metaphysical art (Salvador Dalì and Giorgio de Chirico in particular) are undoubtedly the first points of reference that come to mind when looking at Czupryn’s paintings. However, the artist’s most important sources of inspiration are the works of the photographer Diane Arbus and American artist Matthew Barney.


David Czupryn
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

October 1st, 2017 until
December 16th, 2017
Curated by ARTUNER