Jesse Wine

Human Dreams I, 2013

C-Print

42 × 28 cm

Edition size: 3


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Artwork
Description

Wine reprocesses his fascination and tactile concerns about his medium of choice through the use photography. Whether capturing the ripples of a stream (as seen in his work Kbye shown at the RCA in 2010) or extending his interest in footwear beyond the kiln by cataloguing shoes spotted in public on his Instagram account, there is always a haptic and visual nod to his ceramic oeuvre.

Stemming from the series Human Dreams, the two photographs featured in this exhibition were taken on holiday on the Turkish Dacta peninsula using a half-frame camera, with a halved exposure width that is responsible for the black strip dissecting the images. While this allows for an economic ‘creative outlet in an unfamiliar zone’, as Wine explains, it also enables the artist to bring to the fore the elements he wishes to draw attention to. The battered bark of a trunk, for instance, recalls the undulating surface of his vessels, while the disparity between the parched bottom of the palm and its lush top mirrors the fluctuations and interchanges between glazed and unglazed elements visible in several of his other ceramic works.

About
the artist

Jesse Wine (b. 1983) is a British artist who is primarily working with ceramics. He lives and works in London and graduated from the Royal College of Art, London with an MA in Fine Art in 2010. He has exhibited in galleries and museums internationally and was the recipient of the Camden Arts Ceramics fellowship in 2013-2014.

Using a recently acquired second-hand industrial kiln in his South London studio, Wine fires works that are multifaceted and remarkably textured. Multiple glazes are often applied and showcase a wide range of colours while generating various degrees of surface reflexivity. Wine’s approach is chance-driven as his firing processes add shapes, forms and hues that are often not entirely predetermined.

At times Jesse Wine’s vessels take on a more figurative form, defining themselves as a plate of food, a snail, a bottle of wine, a shoe, or human heads among many other formats. These subjects stem from the artist’s exploratory interest in human behaviour. Wine’s exhibition style also operates with a venerable degree of theatrically and environmental concern, where objects give the appearance of human interactivity, outline a human form or, to cite an example from a recent exhibition, manifest themselves as three self portrait-puppets floating like an Alexander Calder mobile. His vessels are never used functionally despite their frequent semblance as objects that are designed to contain.

Wine is also intrigued by the notion of copying and learns through making and remaking, as many facsimiles of completed works don’t make it through the firing process. His predisposition to the philosophy of copying also pertains to the history of ceramics where he remakes and re-invigorates artists’ works from the canon of ceramics including John Mason, Ken Price, and Peter Voulkos all of whose sculptures he remade at his exhibition, Young Man Red at the Baltic. ARTUNER's exhibition Take Carefor instance, juxtaposes ceramics by Jesse Wine to those by Ettore Sottsass, creating an interesting dialogue between the two artists.

A juxtapositional framework threads the work of the artist, whose creations are undeniably contemporary but exist through an age-old medium with a viscosity that emphatically re-affirms that they are made of the earth.


Using a recently acquired second-hand industrial kiln in his South London studio, Wine fires works that are multifaceted and remarkably textured. Multiple glazes are often applied and showcase a wide range of colours while generating various degrees of surface reflexivity. Wine’s approach is chance-driven as his firing processes add shapes, forms and hues that are often not entirely predetermined.

A juxtapositional framework threads the work of the artist, whose creations are undeniably contemporary but exist through an age-old medium with a viscosity that emphatically re-affirms that they are made of the earth.


Jesse Wine
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

January 12th, 2015 until
April 12th, 2015
Curated by ARTUNER