Jesse Wine

Ideal Standard II, 2014

Glazed Ceramic

58 × 42 × 44 cm


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Artwork
Description

Jesse Wine responded to the idea of showing his work alongside that of Ettore Sottsass by creating nine new works made specifically for Take Care. While Wine has made dozens of copies of works by master potters and ceramic artists (most recently at his solo exhibition ‘Young man red’ at Gateshead’s BALTIC), and the idea of re-imagining ceramics made by other artists has been an important part of his work to date, in this case he chose to display three series that represents the latest evolution of his personal style.

Wine’s approach is chance driven as his firing processes add shapes, forms and colours that are often not entirely predetermined. Surfaces seem to peel, glazes layer uncontentedly over others, underglazes cover overglazes in habitual reversals of procedure. Rather than some flip attitude, or valorisation of the amateurish or unskilled, this is a considered response to the scientific business of shaping, glazing and firing clay. The vessels, or pots, are objects that Wine makes compulsively alongside other works – they are often fashioned of recycled or hard-to-use clay, which accounts for their lubberly, quite homely, appearance. Everything remains, to some degree, an experiment.

Works in each of the three series, named after bathroom fitting companies, are distinguished by their form and finish. The three vessels grouped under Ideal Standard feature a seemingly seeping, dense, volcanic glaze that blistered under the heat of the firing process. The three ceramics called Armitage Shanks are a variation of Ideal Standard, as they hold another, wheel-thrown vessel within them. The last series, Duravit, resembles wounded torsos or crumpled lungs, incised with everyday doodles and scratch marks.

When Wine talks about making a work, he also acknowledges how the medium reflects the maker: “The really amazing thing about clay is that it picks up your every move. If you come into contact with the material in any way it will show back to you what you have done. In this way clay has an existential effect on the person working with it.” However, his works nearly always contain an autobiographical reference that often remains unknown to the viewer.

About
the artist

Jesse Wine (b. 1983) is a British artist who is primarily working with ceramics. He lives and works in London and graduated from the Royal College of Art, London with an MA in Fine Art in 2010. He has exhibited in galleries and museums internationally and was the recipient of the Camden Arts Ceramics fellowship in 2013-2014.

Using a recently acquired second-hand industrial kiln in his South London studio, Wine fires works that are multifaceted and remarkably textured. Multiple glazes are often applied and showcase a wide range of colours while generating various degrees of surface reflexivity. Wine’s approach is chance-driven as his firing processes add shapes, forms and hues that are often not entirely predetermined.

At times Jesse Wine’s vessels take on a more figurative form, defining themselves as a plate of food, a snail, a bottle of wine, a shoe, or human heads among many other formats. These subjects stem from the artist’s exploratory interest in human behaviour. Wine’s exhibition style also operates with a venerable degree of theatrically and environmental concern, where objects give the appearance of human interactivity, outline a human form or, to cite an example from a recent exhibition, manifest themselves as three self portrait-puppets floating like an Alexander Calder mobile. His vessels are never used functionally despite their frequent semblance as objects that are designed to contain.

Wine is also intrigued by the notion of copying and learns through making and remaking, as many facsimiles of completed works don’t make it through the firing process. His predisposition to the philosophy of copying also pertains to the history of ceramics where he remakes and re-invigorates artists’ works from the canon of ceramics including John Mason, Ken Price, and Peter Voulkos all of whose sculptures he remade at his exhibition, Young Man Red at the Baltic. ARTUNER's exhibition Take Carefor instance, juxtaposes ceramics by Jesse Wine to those by Ettore Sottsass, creating an interesting dialogue between the two artists.

A juxtapositional framework threads the work of the artist, whose creations are undeniably contemporary but exist through an age-old medium with a viscosity that emphatically re-affirms that they are made of the earth.


Using a recently acquired second-hand industrial kiln in his South London studio, Wine fires works that are multifaceted and remarkably textured. Multiple glazes are often applied and showcase a wide range of colours while generating various degrees of surface reflexivity. Wine’s approach is chance-driven as his firing processes add shapes, forms and hues that are often not entirely predetermined.

A juxtapositional framework threads the work of the artist, whose creations are undeniably contemporary but exist through an age-old medium with a viscosity that emphatically re-affirms that they are made of the earth.


Jesse Wine
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

January 12th, 2015 until
April 12th, 2015
Curated by ARTUNER