Artie Vierkant

Image Object Sunday 2 December 2014 5:54PM, 2014

UV Print on Dibond

203 × 203 cm


Interested in purchasing this work?

Enquire

Additional Information

Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity.

We offer collectors a range of shipping options including a variety of specialist art couriers.
Please allow four to six weeks for the artwork to arrive after purchase.

Artwork
Description

The most recent works created by Artie Viekrant aim at merging the spheres of physical and digital world. Indeed, his artworks inhabit an ambiguous space as they exist both in the material world as solid PVC wall-mounted sculptures and in the digital one, where they enjoy pre-natal existence and an Internet afterlife. Key to the understanding of such works, their digital presence certainly intrigues the artist from the very start of the creation process, when he sieves through a digital file, containing numerous, diverse and multifaceted versions of itself, and picks one manifestation from the rich magma. The chosen combination is then brought into the material world as a UV print on dibond and finally carved out to its definitive physical shape. To further enhance the polymorphic qualities of his work, these sculptures are simultaneously sharp and blurry – a paradox amalgamating the clear-cut edges of the works and the soft digital brushstrokes on their surface. Then, the installation shots taken to document the exhibited artworks once more transform the essence of these pieces and turn them into images of objects, or rather Image Objects. The nomadic digital existence of the Image Objects means that they will appear on gallery websites, online publications and many other digital platforms. At every turn, however, they might be modified by Photoshop tools to accommodate new needs and result in ever-changing entities.

The Silicon Valley novelist Robin Sloan has termed such artworks ‘flip-flops’: pieces of art that are created in the physical world, that are introduced into the digital sphere and eventually are re-proposed as material objects, sometimes repeating the cycle infinite times. Viekrant’s sculptures aptly respond to contemporary culture, where the constant circulation of and exposure to images has become simultaneously trivial and a virtually inexhaustible source of inspiration, that one could appropriate and manipulate to build new visual material. Once digitised, the Image Objects actively become part of a culture that seeks and requires immediate digital access: if given the opportunity, networked social and collaborative initiatives will gain strength and capacity. The sculptures are physically created and digitally transformed and given new identities essentially by the same technology, and in this sense they are self-referential. Indeed, they are at the same time an emblem and a poignant commentary of today’s society.

About
the artist

Artie Vierkant (b. 1986, Breinerd, MN) studied Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated with an MFA at the University of California. He now lives and works in New York.

Vierkant makes art that is centred upon the importance of representation across media. This is evidenced throughout his practice, whether in the documentation or the process of creating his works. The interaction between physical and digital entities propagates debates related to both the development of art in a “post-internet” age and to its contemporaneous Intellectual Property rights.

Vierkant's work often exists within the nexus of the physical and the digital, resulting in a hybridisation, illustrated in his decisive exhibition Image-Object, in which works were photographed and then transformed. There is a definite tangible element, communicated through photography, which necessitates the capturing of a physical object. However, by altering the compositions digitally, something fundamentally different and physically nonexistent is created. A digital-image-only existence. Accordingly, Vierkant subverts the conventional teleology of art, which usually ends with the exhibition. This speaks to the evolution of an increasingly digitised culture, in which online interactions are rapidly overtaking physical encounters. In The Image-Object Post Internet Vierkant views his work as a part of a system of meaning, where “Post-Internet objects and images are developed with concern to their particular materiality as well as their vast variety of methods of presentation and dissemination.” Resultantly, the materials he uses, such as aluminum, stainless steel and fibreglass, become representative of the current technological apex.

There is also a concern represented in his exploration of Intellectual Property, where mental creations are labeled as conceptual entities. This form of commodity, enmeshed into social structures, becomes a material that can be used as such or acquired and incorporated into an artwork. This involves a transaction and transmutation; just like any physical material there are limits related to its use. However, these are based upon legal limitations imposed by the owner. This creates a discourse, taking place between boundaries, exploring changing relationships between the virtual and the real and confounding classification. Through his work, Vierkant becomes a sculptor in a traditional sense, a digital artist and a digital sculptor. Each composition contains physical and digital elements, which are integrated into a systemic relationship advancing technologies, branded materials and other Intellectual Property variants.


Vierkant makes art that is centred upon the importance of representation across media. This is evidenced throughout his practice, whether in the documentation or the process of creating his works. The interaction between physical and digital entities propagates debates related to both the development of art in a “post-internet” age and to its contemporaneous Intellectual Property rights.

There is also a concern represented in his exploration of Intellectual Property, where mental creations are labeled as conceptual entities. This form of commodity, enmeshed into social structures, becomes a material that can be used as such or acquired and incorporated into an artwork.


Artie Vierkant
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

December 8th, 2014 until
February 25th, 2015
Curated by Kirsty Ogg