Toby Ziegler

Shadow systems, 2017

Oil Paint on Aluminium

110 x 177 cm


Interested in purchasing this work?

Enquire

Additional Information

Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity.

We offer collectors a range of shipping options including a variety of specialist art couriers.
Please allow four to six weeks for the artwork to arrive after purchase.

Artwork
Description

Toby Ziegler’s work toys with human perception while drawing abstraction and figuration close to one another. The work reveals and blurs at the same time, allowing for a movement between the virtual and the actual. The process is important: pictorial space is mapped out digitally, which in-turn is translated onto a material surface by Ziegler’s own hand. The question remains in Ziegler’s work: are we looking at computer graphic, or manual copy?

In ‘Shadow systems’, Ziegler eschews direct treatment of Matisse’s ‘La Danse’ in favour of an image of the work’s installation.  It is the (re) presentation of a photograph taken at the Hermitage Amsterdam, prior to the 2010 exhibition: Matisse to Malevich. The blurred text at the bottom of the aluminum panel requires intense scrutiny to read; asking much of the spectator’s own ocular proficiency. The work simultaneously attracts and repels: the green paint takes the form of a screen, while the treatment of the figures appears radiographic. Ziegler’s work allows us to both to see and not see. Is the installation team rendered absurd, contemplating an image they themselves cannot see? Or do they occupy a privileged position denied to the spectator? ‘Shadow systems’ not only asks if you can see but also if you are you entitled to.

About
the artist

Toby Ziegler (b. 1972) is a British artist who lives and works in London. He graduated from Central St. Martins School of Art and Design in 1994.

Ziegler’s practice encompasses both painting and sculpture. His work involves the manipulation of perception: abstraction and figuration fraternise, classical compositions surrender to digital reworking. Ziegler begins with mined Internet images and coerces them into material form, fashioning an exchange between the virtual and the actual. The starting point may vary: Matisse, Constable or Dutch still-life. Once selected, however, the image is inscribed onto either canvas or aluminium panels by Ziegler’s own hand, an intricate and meticulous process that allows for the appearance of the artist’s own idiosyncrasies. Following the application of paint, the image is subject to a period of erasure, which Ziegler refers to as: evacuation. Evacuation involves the use of correction fluid or a metal grinder in order to distort and degrade; reducing the image down until Ziegler deems that what is left is, necessary.

Ziegler’s works are terrains both familiar and strange: the transformative process designed to test the limits of imitation against a Neo-Platonic system of ideals. This is what underpins the sequence of images, which loop on LED screens in many of his exhibitions. The screens recite the conversion of the originally selected source material into Ziegler’s own works, and then the permeation of that work into popular culture. The suggestion being that contemporary art and pop culture are the by-products of the same – imperfect – process of imitation.  For Ziegler, it is the duty of the artist to interpret the mechanisms behind this process, to reveal all its mimetic and degraded nuances.


Ziegler’s works are terrains both familiar and strange: the transformative process designed to test the limits of imitation against a Neo-Platonic system of ideals. This is what underpins the sequence of images, which loop on LED screens in many of his exhibitions. The screens recite the conversion of the originally selected source material into Ziegler’s own works, and then the permeation of that work into popular culture. The suggestion being that contemporary art and pop culture are the by-products of the same – imperfect – process of imitation.  For Ziegler, it is the duty of the artist to interpret the mechanisms behind this process, to reveal all its mimetic and degraded nuances.


Toby Ziegler
on Artuner

Part of the
exhibition

February 28th, 2017 until
April 15th, 2017
Curated by ARTUNER